"Mr. Thompson, it occurs to me that you are a snail. A snail whose sense of humor went on holiday and never did return."

100% accurate quote definitely accurate 100%.

"I’ve wondered […] if Fallon hadn’t a touch of the inferiority complex, shown in part by his derisive attitude towards authority and his penchant for punishing himself by keeping himself always broke and in trouble, and by his morbid affairs with many women. Fallon ruined himself just as surely as if he had set about the job deliberately."
— Donald Henderson Clarke, In the Reign of Rothstein

WELL HI. traveling time has ended, returning has occurred, and i s’pose what i am saying is i’m BACK. was upper Michigan-ing with mein sister and parents (with brief appearances by sister’s husband and by our youngest brother), staying at ehhh four different campgrounds, soooo that was a thing. lotta lakes, lotta trees, lotta wandering and hiking. some things about the trip…

so those are some things that happened. all in all, ‘twas a fine time. will be nice to be not in close quarters with people, though. and to maybe (ahhah we’ll see) get brain into a gear.

i’ll be trying to catch up with things around here, though internet is still being a snail-slow shite, so it’ll probably take a while, and probably won’t happen as thoroughly as i’d like. BUT ANYWAY. i should be around or around-ish, and hope you-all’ve been fine and snazzy.

O-KAY going now bye now

will to be in the land of lakes and trees and absent internet for a week. catch you-all after. and ‘til then, be well and take care and watch out for falling catfish.

Desolation Row
Bob Dylan - Highway 61 Revisited (139)

i could sleep

or

i could keep tossing songs onto a shiny new playlist yes that sounds like a fine plan.

"Wild is your way, and wild your soul,
Poor, broken instrument!"
— Henrik Ibsen, Brand [transl. Michael Meyer]
books0977:

Footlight Flirtation (1912). Everett Shinn (American 1876–1953). Oil on canvas.
Footlight Flirtation depicts vaudeville. Shinn drew inspiration from Edgar Degas by incorporating the viewer into the audience and here, places the viewer in the second row of the theatre, immediately behind three elegant ladies, a man in a white tie, and the orchestra conductor. The viewer is drawn to the woman on stage who lifts her dress, exposing her leg as she fixes us in her gaze and continues with her act.

books0977:

Footlight Flirtation (1912). Everett Shinn (American 1876–1953). Oil on canvas.

Footlight Flirtation depicts vaudeville. Shinn drew inspiration from Edgar Degas by incorporating the viewer into the audience and here, places the viewer in the second row of the theatre, immediately behind three elegant ladies, a man in a white tie, and the orchestra conductor. The viewer is drawn to the woman on stage who lifts her dress, exposing her leg as she fixes us in her gaze and continues with her act.

"In our quotidian lives, we live in constant repetitions of habitual patterns. […] Art should offer experiences that alter these patterns, awaken what is asleep, and remind us of our original terror."
— Anne Bogart, ‘Terror, Disorientation and Difficulty’ [published in Theatre of the Avante-Garde: 1950-2000, ed. Robert Knopf and Julia Listengarten]

please don’t ever talk about sticky pickles again unless you have a good reason or would be in a pickle if you kept quiet on the subject of sticky pickles then i guess you can talk about stick pickles all you want.


printed in the Altoona Tribune, 16 June 1924

i’d say this is Mickey, but you know what this guy’s actually doing yard work so never mind.

printed in the Altoona Tribune, 16 June 1924

i’d say this is Mickey, but you know what this guy’s actually doing yard work so never mind.

should i finish packing? PROBABLY.

but then i’d have to choose books and i don’t like choosing i just want to take every book is that so much to ask YOU NEVER KNOW what books my brain might want next week YOU NEVER KNOW.

french horn and mellophone caused my pinky fingers to become forever confused they do not know how to behave when pointing they do not know that they are not supposed to participate in pointing they are lost forever.

"[Art] should begin the process of freeing men by calling into doubt the solidity of objects—and laying bare the fact that it is a web of relations that exists, only; that web held taut in each instance by the focal point of consciousness that is separate individual consciousness."
— Richard Foreman, ‘How to Write a Play (in which i am really telling myself how, but if you are the right one i am telling you how, too)’ [published in Theatre of the Avante-Garde: 1950-2000, ed. Robert Knopf and Julia Listengarten]